About us

AEB software supports the global trade and logistics processes of businesses in the industrial, commercial, and service sectors. More than 5,000 customers from over 35 countries use AEB solutions for shipping, transport and warehouse management, customs clearance, import and export management, sanctions list screening, and export controls. AEB's portfolio extends from ready-to-go software products from the cloud to a tailored but highly adaptive logistics platform. AEB solutions bring greater transparency, efficiency, cost reductions, and legal protection to supply chain management as a whole, making companies more flexible and increase their capabilities to react. AEB has more than 450 employees worldwide.

Products and services

AEB software supports the global trade and logistics processes of businesses in the industrial, commercial, and service sectors. More than 5,000 customers from over 35 countries use AEB solutions for shipping, transport and warehouse management, customs clearance, import and export management, sanctions list screening, and export controls. AEB's portfolio extends from ready-to-go software products from the cloud to a tailored but highly adaptive logistics platform. AEB solutions bring greater transparency, efficiency, cost reductions, and legal protection to supply chain management as a whole, making companies more flexible and increase their capabilities to react. AEB has more than 450 employees worldwide.

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AEB Asia Pacific
1, 14-01 North Bridge Road, High Street Centre
179094 Singapore
Republic of Singapore

Phone: +65 93877921
Internet: www.aeb.com
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News & Innovations

Economic Blueprint: Asia Pacific renaissance


At the recent World Economic Forum in Hanoi, Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong took to the podium and detailed an impressive list of achievements by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN).

ASEAN, he said, will become the fourth-largest economy in the world by 2030 after the US, China and the EU.
Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong
Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong

‘’We have a young and educated workforce,’’ he told the crowd of political, business, and economic leaders from around the world. ‘’Sixty percent of our population is under 35 years old. They are comfortable with new technology and the digital economy in ASEAN is projected to grow to reach $200 billion by 2025.’’

‘’ASEAN is committed to further economic integration,’’ he said. ‘’This is an important condition for the Fourth Industrial Revolution, because it is about building networks, creating new synergies, and staying connected. ASEAN member states have been working together towards the ASEAN Economic Blueprint 2025, so that ASEAN businesses can operate more seamlessly across the region. It is important to involve the businesses because the private sector, especially the small and medium enterprises, is the backbone of our economies and source of entrepreneurship.’’

Frans Kok, General Manager of AEB Asia Pacific, says that key among the many ASEAN initiatives is one between Vietnam and Singapore that has established seven industrial parks and created a business model that is acting as a driver in the burgeoning economy.

According to Prime Minister Lee, the parks are now bringing $11 billion in investment funding from more than 800 international companies. They have generated more than 200,000 jobs.

‘’These joint developments encourage companies to set up factories in this park with preferred conditions,’’ said Frans Kok. ‘’For the local economy it means a boost in employment, sharing knowledge and skills, services to be offered to these companies, supply chain business for local companies, and business for part and component suppliers.’’
Frans Kok
Frans Kok

Frans Kok said investing companies often get tax benefits, have the possibility of 100 percent foreign ownership (which is not always possible under normal circumstances), access to an experienced labor pool, and the potential to avoid tariffs in the fallout from the global trade war.

The challenges? Frans Kok says those include some need for infrastructure improvements, customs procedures can be more labor intensive and supply chain routes can be longer.

For companies doing business in a Vietnam-Singapore industrial park, AEB’s suite of customs and supply chain management software can make the difference between difficult to manage satellite operation and a smooth running, profitable extension of the company.

Those include:

AEB Customs Management is the central platform for managing your customs processes. With end-to-end IT integration and smart automation, you accelerate your customs processes and save valuable resources.
AEB Export Management supports you with both customs management and export controls. The many features include integration of your customs brokers around the world, local direct filing, a powerful solution for classifying your product portfolio, sanctions list screening – even automated export license management.
AEB Supply Chain Collaboration works together with all your supply chain partners. The functionalities include continuous bi-directional status exchanges at every level – transport, order, consignment, or the individual item.
AEB Trade Compliance Management automatically runs restricted party screening for you in the background. The intelligent software, which can be used anywhere in the world, warns you before a business partner becomes a liability. Quickly and reliably, while the rest of your business continues uninterrupted.

‘’Managing a supply chain into a manufacturing plant from another country can be a challenge,’’ said Kok. ‘’ We can bring visibility into the operations and help manage customs processes in a way that save both time and money.’’

Prime Minister Lee said the investing companies are taking part in his vision for a fourth industrial revolution.

‘’The global economy is being fundamentally transformed by new and far reaching breakthroughs in technologies,’’ he said. ‘’Businesses are changing the way they operate, workers are using technology to become more productive, customers are changing how they make their purchases, and markets are growing bigger and becoming increasingly integrated.

‘’Here in ASEAN, member states are in a good position to take advantage of the new opportunities that this 4IR can bring.’’

Further reading
Customs under a no-deal Brexit


The UK government published a range of technical notices and trader guidance documents from August to October. You can find a good overview of relevant publications here.

Latest notices explain how trade between the UK and EU countries might change in case the UK was to leave the EU (and its Single Market and Customs Union) without a deal in March, 2019. And how to prepare for it.

For those that have been waiting for a signal to kick-off preparations of customs processes, this was it. Not the first, but a clear and loud one. Free trade with the EU and moving goods across UK borders without red tape will be a thing of the past.

The new government papers make it clear that trade between the UK and EU will involve customs procedures where previously not required.
Impacts for traders across the board: in new and established sectors

In a nutshell, UK businesses engaged in import and export to or from the EU will need to register for a UK Economic Operator Registration and Identification (EORI) and submit import and export customs declarations.

Traders can do this themselves (self-filing) or work with a customs broker. It's important to note that volumes for both, the number of customs declarations and that of broker engagements are forecast to skyrocket under Brexit developments.

All this results in slower processing times and increased costs for euro transactions – with clear impacts on business revenues.

The food and drink industry along with other sectors such as automotive, pharmaceuticals, or aerospace and defense, have been warning about the impact of Brexit-related border delays on supply chains for some time now – and a forecast on more expected costs is terrible news for businesses.
Brexit update
Logical consequence: damage control through transactional savings on customs

It’s high time for businesses now to shape up. This means preparing their trade teams for upcoming customs procedures and upgrading or implementing their relevant customs software.

Automating customs processes will drive efficiency and compliance, and deliver the desired transactional savings while avoiding collateral damages through border delays and incorrect duty payments. This applies to self-managed Export Filing and Import Filing, for example.

But it also includes outsourced customs services. Customs Broker Integration is key to success because system-integrated collaboration with brokers is significantly cheaper, faster, and more secure than traditional paper-based processes.

The good news about this kind of investment is that it won’t be wasted whichever way Brexit will go. That's because implementing customs software mitigates risks from Brexit as much as from other global trade changes – and it drives forward the digitization agenda of businesses at the same time.

The time to wait has past, contact AEB solution experts to discuss your individual business requirements for digitizing Customs Management.
Further reading
AEB and shipcloud join forces
STUTTGART (AEB) - Good news for the online trade: AEB and Hamburg-based shipping service provider shipcloud are joining forces in what is being called a a cooperation and development partnership.

The move is aimed at creating solutions for the digitization of shipping logistics in the e-Commerce sector. The two companies already have a joint pilot customer signed on and in operation.

"The cooperation between AEB and shipcloud creates a unique shipping platform that enables online merchants to connect their ERP, shop or merchandise management systems to the systems of more than 150 CEP service providers and forwarding agents via an easily integrated, uniform interface," said Steffen Frey, a member of AEB's Board of Directors.

Frey said online retailers will be enabled by the ''high performance'' platform ''even with very high shipment volumes".

Stefan Hollmann, founder and managing director of shipcloud, said both firms bring considerable core competencies to the table that compliment each other.

''AEB has sound know-how in the field of logistics and customs software for industrial and commercial customers,'' he said. ''And shipcloud has sound know-how in interface development and in the integration of shipping solutions into the systems of online retailers.''

Hollmann said solutions from both companies play to market trends, such as the want from many customers to choose a delivery service.

"Online merchants need software support to deliver the multi-carrier connectivity customers want,'' he said. ''Today, more than 50 plug-ins or integrations are available via shipcloud, with which your own shop, ERP or merchandise management system can be connected to all major shipping service providers.''

The same attributes apply to fulfillment service providers, looking for an uncomplicated integration of as many relevant logistics providers as possible into their own e-commerce solution. And this is also true for forwarders and CEP service providers, who want to integrate small and medium-sized customers.

AEB's Frey noted that more and more industrial companies are discovering the e-commerce market for themselves, selling goods online especially in the B2B sector.

"Industrial customers have high demands on tracking, returns management and immediate on-boarding of new logistics service providers, especially in the B2B business, which we are able to map excellently together with shipcloud," he said.

With its Carrier Connect solution, AEB already has many years of experience in high-performance printing of shipping labels or in returns logistics.

As a leading provider of IT solutions for customs and foreign trade, AEB, together with shipcloud, intends to develop holistic solution packages in the medium term that support eCommerce companies in international shipping.

The partners see a high demand with the corresponding requirements, such as customs clearance, integration of international carriers and the prescribed sanction list check.

An advantage here is AEB's presence at 18 locations in 10 countries. In addition, shipcloud and AEB see a growing demand for data-driven analysis and optimization services.

"There is great potential in the market for a comprehensive offering that is now being jointly created," said Hollmann.
Further reading

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